The Legacy of Emory at Grady: Notable Firsts

Pictured (L to R, top to bottom): Historical Grady Memorial Hospital promotional ad; Evangeline T. Papageorge; 1950s Grady children's ward nurse and patient; R. Bruce Logue and patient; Grady staff and patient (date unknown)
Pictured (L to R, top to bottom): Historical Grady Memorial Hospital promotional ad; Evangeline T. Papageorge; 1950s Grady children's ward nurse and patient; R. Bruce Logue and patient; Grady staff and patient (date unknown)

Pictured (L to R, top to bottom): Historical Grady Memorial Hospital promotional ad; Evangeline T. Papageorge; 1950s Grady children’s ward nurse and patient; R. Bruce Logue and patient; Grady staff and patient (date unknown)

1896 A children’s ward opens at Grady Memorial Hospital—the first in Georgia and reportedly the first in the Southeast.

1920  The first women of color to be certified as nurses by the state of Georgia graduate from Grady’s Municipal Training School for Colored Nurses.

Property of Georgia State University Library

Students of the Grady Municipal Training School for Colored Nurses holding their diplomas in front of the Albert Steiner Ward, Atlanta, 1933.

1921  Grady physician William R. Smith performs Georgia’s first successful open-heart surgery, setting the stage for Grady’s world-class trauma center.

1923  Georgia’s first cancer specialty clinic, the Steiner Clinic, is established at Grady. By 1930, Steiner is the largest comprehensive cancer hospital in the world.

1929  Evangeline T. Papageorge is the first woman appointed to Emory’s full-time medical faculty.

1942  Emory physicians Eugene A. Stead, Jr. and James Warren bring national recognition to Grady by establishing Georgia’s first cardiac catheterization lab, one of only three such facilities in the world at the time.

1943  Elizabeth Gambrell is the first woman to attend Emory University School of Medicine.

1946  R. Bruce Logue, often called the “father of cardiology at Emory,” establishes Emory’s first cardiology residency at Grady.

R. Bruce Logue, the "father of cardiology at Emory"

R. Bruce Logue, the “father of cardiology at Emory”

1949  Emory opthalmogist F. Phinizy Calhoun, Jr. helps establish the Grady Clay Memorial Eye Clinic (the fifth “eye bank” to be established in the United States) for corneal-transplant patients.

1951  Emory heart surgeon Osler Abbott performs the South’s first successful intracardiac operation.

 

 

 

Other notable firsts:

  • In the 20th century, Grady established Georgia’s only polio center. In fact, it was volunteer Emory School of Medicine faculty member and renowned medical leader James E. Paullin who attended President Franklin D. Roosevelt when he died in Warm Springs.
  • Paullin was also the first physician in Georgia to prescribe insulin for diabetes and one of the first to use the Wassermann test for detecting syphilis.
  • Grady was one of the earliest hospitals in the United States to have a dialysis machine.
  • Other early innovations adopted by Grady include the X-ray machine, diet therapy (followed by studies in nutritional research), safe blood transfusions, sulfa drugs, and the establishment of a blood bank.

 

 

Related Links/Sources
The Legacy of Emory at Grady: Grady Memorial Hospital
Raising the Bar: 150 Years of a Medical School in Motion
Grady Health System
Emory University School of Medicine
Emory University Department of Medicine
• Jordan Messler’s April 2015 presentation at Medicine Grand Rounds
A Marriage Made in Atlanta
Emory at Grady

 

 

About the Author

Emory Department of Medicine
Emory Department of Medicine

The Emory University Department of Medicine, within the Emory University School of Medicine, is steeped in a rich tradition of excellence. Through the work of its nine divisions and numerous centers and institutes, the department has pioneered discoveries in medicine, education, scientific and clinical investigation, and clinical care. Emory University School of Medicine’s medical school, residency, transitional-year, and fellowship programs offer students the latest knowledge in treatment practices, scientific theories, research, and patient care.

The Emory University Department of Medicine is a component of the Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University, which includes the Emory schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health; Yerkes National Primate Research Center; Winship Cancer Institute; and Emory Healthcare.

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